makefile – Compiling C++ on remote Linux machine – clock skew detected warning

makefile – Compiling C++ on remote Linux machine – clock skew detected warning

That message is usually an indication that some of your files have modification times later than the current system time. Since make decides which files to compile when performing an incremental build by checking if a source files has been modified more recently than its object file, this situation can cause unnecessary files to be built, or worse, necessary files to not be built.

However, if you are building from scratch (not doing an incremental build) you can likely ignore this warning without consequence.

Typically this occurs when building in a NFS mounted directory, and the clocks on the client and the NFS server are out of sync.

The solution is to run an NTP client on both the NFS server and all clients.

makefile – Compiling C++ on remote Linux machine – clock skew detected warning

Install the Network Time Protocol

This also happened to me when running make on a Samba SMB CIFS share on a server.
A durable solution consists in installing the ntp daemon on both the server and the client.
(Please, note that this problem is not solved by running ntpdate. This would resolve the time difference only temporarily, but not in the future.)

For Ubuntu and Debian-derived systems, simply type the following line at the command line:

$ sudo apt install ntp

Moreover, one will still need to issue the command touch * once (and only once) in the affected directory to correct the file modification times once and for all.

$ touch *

For more information about the differences between ntp and ntpdate, please refer to:

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